Capoeira Resources

Song Lyrics

Ai ai, Aidê
Joga bonito que eu quero aprender
Ai ai, Aidê
Já começa vai você
Ai ai, Aidê
Como vai, como passou, como vai vosmecê
Ai ai, Aidê
Eu venci a batalha de Camugerê

Ai ai, Aidê
Play beautifully so that I can learn
Ai ai, Aidê
It starts, you go
Ai ai, Aidê
How’s it going, what happened, how are you?
Ai ai, Aidê
I won the battle of Camugerê

Aidê was the name of an African woman. She was beautiful, with green eyes, and a magical singing voice, and she could cook. The master of the house fell in love with her and wanted to marry her. She managed to escape and flee to the quilombo Camugerê. Here she found freedom and kinship with other escaped Africans who’d managed to flee their captors. Source

Abalou Cachoeira abalou
Abalou deixa abalar
Abalou Cachoeira abalou
Abalou Rio de Janeiro
Abalou Cachoeira abalou
Abalou Minas Gerais

Shook Cachoeira shook
It shook, let it shake
Shook Cachoeira shook
It shook, Rio de Janeiro shook
Shook Cachoeira shook
It shook, Minas Gerais shook

Cachoeira is along the Paraguaçu River in the interior Recôncavo of Bahia. Cachoeira was the center of the independence movement in the early 19th century and the center of the War of the Independence of Bahia.

Camugerê
Como vai, como tá?
Camugerê
Como vai vosmecê?
Camugerê
Eu vou bem de saúde
Camugerê
Pra mim é um prazer

Camugerê
How are you, how is it?
Camugerê
How are you doing?
Camugerê
I am in good health
Camugerê
For me, it's a pleasure

Camugerê (or Camujerê) was the name of a large Quilombo that existed in Brazil in the days of slavery. Quilombos were communities hidden deep in the jungle, settled by the enslaved Africans who had managed to escape from captivity.

Vosmecê is an old form of Portuguese that is no longer used.
It was originally used to address people who didn’t have the authority to be addressed as “Senhor(a)” (Sir/Madam). Source

Ô sim, sim, sim, Ô não, não, não
Hoje tem, amanhã não
Hoje tem, amanhã não
Ô sim, sim, sim, ô não, nâo, não
Hoje tem, amanhã não
Olha pisada de Lampião

Oh yes, yes, yes, oh no, no, no
Today you have, tomorrow you don't
Today you have, tomorrow you don't
Oh yes, yes, yes, oh no, no, no
Today you have, tomorrow you don't
Watch for the steps of Lampião

"Captain" Virgulino Ferreira da Silva, better known as Lampião, was probably the twentieth century's most successful traditional bandit leader. The banditry endemic to the Brazilian Northeast was called Cangaço. Cangaço had origins in the late 19th century but was particularly prevalent in the 1920s and 1930s. Source